fordhamfans.com
March 28, 2017, 12:22:08 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News:
 
  Home Help Search Gallery Login Register  

Is Villanova A Good Model for Fordham Athletics?


Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Is Villanova A Good Model for Fordham Athletics?  (Read 4871 times)
Rich93
Class of 93
Hall of Famer
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 11779


View Profile
« Reply #30 on: April 05, 2016, 11:59:49 am »

Sometimes the trouble with asking a coach for a strategic vision is that his long-term goal might be different than what is best for the program. A coach may want to win now so they can be gone tomorrow while the program needs to win and set up a plan for where to take it from there.

Excellent point but in this case I think the institution and coach's goals of winning now intersect nicely.
Report Spam   Logged

WINNING MATTERS
xtey92a
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7797



View Profile
« Reply #31 on: April 05, 2016, 12:32:23 pm »

That's why the Fordham 3000 should be a private initiative.  We appoint someone we know from within with a reputation for making things happened, and we commit our money to him.  He then takes our money, commitment, and ideas to Dave Roach.  Your money is pledged, but safely in your pocket until we accomplish our objective.

During the 1920s, AD Jack Coffey believed that Fordham needed to hire a prominent football coach and establish a visible football program at Fordham.  The university administration didn't help.  So Coffey lined up prominent alumni, and they arranged to pass the hat, and raise the funds necessary to hire Frank Cavanaugh.  There is a precedent for alumni initiative at Fordham.

The Jack Coffey Fund could easily be established. Make it a non-profit to support Fordham Athletes. Shot across the bow.

Winning helps. Getting Students, Alumni, and Fans into the RHG next year is crucial. I'd love to see a home season in the Barc, but getting there is a Hassle for me. For Long Islanders and NYC residents it is much easier. Nice facility.

Next year will be interesting for Fordham, if we keep winning I likely see a move to the Barc.
Report Spam   Logged

#ProudToBeARam
John
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7211


View Profile
« Reply #32 on: April 05, 2016, 08:39:40 pm »

One can look to Villanova, Marquette, Xavier, or any other number of roughly comparable private universities for hints or clues of ways that Fordham might improve its intercollegiate athletic performance.  Ultimately, however, (1) we need a Fordham-centric solution, and (2) it has to be adopted and supported by the folks who manage Fordham University and its affairs.

The Fordham-centric solution is the easier part, but not easy. We need to tailor our solution to thriving in a city with a plethora of pro sports and entertainment options, to a student body which, I suspect, is rather more diverse than 'Nova's (the scenes from the Pavillion were whiter than beluga whales in a snowstorm), and with a lack of mid-sized venues our programs could be readily "transitioned up" to, while we either move to large arenas or build better facilities on campus.

The second requirement is a bear. Yes, a grass-roots movement like the Fordham 3000 concept is fine, but only if the school -- with much broader institutional contacts and resources -- takes up the concept and runs with it.  This is not a problem of resources, nor brains, but will.  Unless Fordham develops an institutional will to use athletics to help highlight its other virtues, none of this will get very far.
Report Spam   Logged
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: April 05, 2016, 09:06:59 pm »

One can look to Villanova, Marquette, Xavier, or any other number of roughly comparable private universities for hints or clues of ways that Fordham might improve its intercollegiate athletic performance.  Ultimately, however, (1) we need a Fordham-centric solution, and (2) it has to be adopted and supported by the folks who manage Fordham University and its affairs.

The Fordham-centric solution is the easier part, but not easy. We need to tailor our solution to thriving in a city with a plethora of pro sports and entertainment options, to a student body which, I suspect, is rather more diverse than 'Nova's (the scenes from the Pavillion were whiter than beluga whales in a snowstorm), and with a lack of mid-sized venues our programs could be readily "transitioned up" to, while we either move to large arenas or build better facilities on campus.

The second requirement is a bear. Yes, a grass-roots movement like the Fordham 3000 concept is fine, but only if the school -- with much broader institutional contacts and resources -- takes up the concept and runs with it.  This is not a problem of resources, nor brains, but will.  Unless Fordham develops an institutional will to use athletics to help highlight its other virtues, none of this will get very far.

100 percent on the money.  Any initiative to move Fordham athletics off the dime has to come from Fordham.  Change only happens if they will it.
Report Spam   Logged
rambacker
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11054


View Profile
« Reply #34 on: April 06, 2016, 08:05:16 am »

Here is the Villanova Athletics Development web page:

http://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/advancement/development/athletic.html
Report Spam   Logged
85
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11279


View Profile
« Reply #35 on: April 06, 2016, 08:28:25 am »

Game plans are great...but you need the right people to execute them..........
Report Spam   Logged
xtey92a
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7797



View Profile
« Reply #36 on: April 06, 2016, 08:48:51 am »

Penn State has an advisory board for Athletics. Virginia has a non profit running ticket sales and awarding Scholarships, the Virginia Athletics Foundation funded/financed the John Paul Jones arena.  Richmond was not willing to fund Athletics, so a non profit was created decades ago.

We've heard stories of athletic donors being re directed towards academics. Not sure if that encourages renewals.
Report Spam   Logged

#ProudToBeARam
85
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11279


View Profile
« Reply #37 on: April 06, 2016, 09:06:51 am »

Penn State has an advisory board for Athletics. Virginia has a non profit running ticket sales and awarding Scholarships, the Virginia Athletics Foundation funded/financed the John Paul Jones arena.  Richmond was not willing to fund Athletics, so a non profit was created decades ago.

 

Can you elaborate on this, who are they giving scholarships to at Virginia?
Report Spam   Logged
Scott W 86
Senior
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2475



View Profile
« Reply #38 on: April 06, 2016, 09:28:11 am »

Penn State has an advisory board for Athletics. Virginia has a non profit running ticket sales and awarding Scholarships, the Virginia Athletics Foundation funded/financed the John Paul Jones arena.  Richmond was not willing to fund Athletics, so a non profit was created decades ago.

We've heard stories of athletic donors being re directed towards academics. Not sure if that encourages renewals.

If that is happening to large donors than they are sheep. One wonders how they amassed enough fortune if they are so malleable.

Report Spam   Logged
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #39 on: April 06, 2016, 09:31:22 am »

Penn State has an advisory board for Athletics. Virginia has a non profit running ticket sales and awarding Scholarships, the Virginia Athletics Foundation funded/financed the John Paul Jones arena.  Richmond was not willing to fund Athletics, so a non profit was created decades ago.

We've heard stories of athletic donors being re directed towards academics. Not sure if that encourages renewals.

The Virginia Athletics Foundation works the same way that foundations for virtually every public university conduct business.  They raise money on behalf of the University and fund university programs and projects. UVa's foundation is no different than any other university related foundation in the country.  They also DO NOT award scholarships.  They raise money so the athletic department can award scholarships for their recruited athletes.  Again, this is no different than what Michigan, Rutgers, Texas or Alabama does.

If you are referring to Fordham's fundraising program, I have never heard of any major gifts being diverted from athletics to another area.  If you know of a case, please give details.
Report Spam   Logged
ace93
Arbitrary and Capricious Administrator
Raging Lunatic
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 20147



View Profile
« Reply #40 on: April 06, 2016, 10:08:32 am »

The Virginia Athletics Foundation works the same way that foundations for virtually every public university conduct business.  They raise money on behalf of the University and fund university programs and projects. UVa's foundation is no different than any other university related foundation in the country.  They also DO NOT award scholarships.  They raise money so the athletic department can award scholarships for their recruited athletes.  Again, this is no different than what Michigan, Rutgers, Texas or Alabama does.

If you are referring to Fordham's fundraising program, I have never heard of any major gifts being diverted from athletics to another area.  If you know of a case, please give details.

One of the donors to the latest dorms at RH supposedly originally wanted the money going to the new arena/student center that was in the last campaign's plans. I can't unequivocally say that it is true nor can I provide details.
Report Spam   Logged

Nothing replaces success in the revenue sports.  Nothing.  That's not to take away from the success in the Olympic sports - they do matter.  It isn't a replacement for success in the flagship sports. - Debbie Yow, AD - NC State
VinnyT37
Waterboy

Offline Offline

Posts: 16


View Profile
« Reply #41 on: April 06, 2016, 10:23:49 am »

100 percent on the money.  Any initiative to move Fordham athletics off the dime has to come from Fordham.  Change only happens if they will it.

This is 100% wrong.

One of Fordham's excuses for not moving on athletics is that the basketball program does not have enough support to justify a new facility or a commitment to justify moving the program to an off-campus venue.

WE need to do something to disprove that, and take that card out of the admin's hand.
Report Spam   Logged
85
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 11279


View Profile
« Reply #42 on: April 06, 2016, 10:50:31 am »

This is 100% wrong.

One of Fordham's excuses for not moving on athletics is that the basketball program does not have enough support to justify a new facility or a commitment to justify moving the program to an off-campus venue.

WE need to do something to disprove that, and take that card out of the admin's hand.

Well, Neuabauer certainly hasnt helped the cause with multiple complaints about attendance. You can sell 2,000 season tickets but if half those dont show up, you will hear the same whining from the coaches and the admin. about a half empty arena.   Subjective and ill advised game day scheduling can make that a reality for the admin. Not on purpose, they are just morons and will schedule 5 home games opposite NFL football while leaving a Saturday wide open.

In my view, what we need is someone new on the inside. Oh, let me turn on my broken record, that means kicking Frank out the door.  Put someone who has a background in fund raising in that spot and go from there.  I admire your gumption but I can see this getting quashed.   

Report Spam   Logged
VinnyT37
Waterboy

Offline Offline

Posts: 16


View Profile
« Reply #43 on: April 06, 2016, 10:57:13 am »

Well, Neuabauer certainly hasnt helped the cause with multiple complaints about attendance. You can sell 2,000 season tickets but if half those dont show up, you will hear the same whining from the coaches and the admin. about a half empty arena.   Subjective and ill advised game day scheduling can make that a reality for the admin. Not on purpose, they are just morons and will schedule 5 home games opposite NFL football while leaving a Saturday wide open.

In my view, what we need is someone new on the inside. Oh, let me turn on my broken record, that means kicking Frank out the door.  Put someone who has a background in fund raising in that spot and go from there.  I admire your gumption but I can see this getting quashed.   



I hear you, but on the other hand, Frank or no Frank, if WE the fans can put together a legitimate plan to sell 6,000 seats per game for 8 games at Barclays, and we get quashed by the powers that be, then I'd suggest using the link below to buy yourself some Villanova gear.  If we show we are ready, willing, and able -- and we get quashed, that tells you all you need to know.

www.villanova.com
Report Spam   Logged
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #44 on: April 06, 2016, 11:09:15 am »

This is 100% wrong.

One of Fordham's excuses for not moving on athletics is that the basketball program does not have enough support to justify a new facility or a commitment to justify moving the program to an off-campus venue.

WE need to do something to disprove that, and take that card out of the admin's hand.

No it's not.  I was at UConn when they made the move to FBS football.  It was an institutionally driven seven year plan.  I worked on the fundraising plan and I talked to AD's all over the country. 

You'll never take the card out of "their" hand.  It's their card and their hand.  The University leadership has to provide juice to make it go.  Any school who has built a strong program from scratch or resurrected a dead program has done it because the University powers recognized what athletics can bring.  BC, UConn, Rutgers, the Florida State schools, Old Dominion, UNC Charlotte, Navy, Coastal Carolina, Stony Brook... you name it.  Alumni jumped on board because the University said this is a priority and we're doing it.  Grassroots efforts are nice but because of the money involved today they're basically meaningless.  It has to come from the top.
Report Spam   Logged
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #45 on: April 06, 2016, 11:14:16 am »

One of the donors to the latest dorms at RH supposedly originally wanted the money going to the new arena/student center that was in the last campaign's plans. I can't unequivocally say that it is true nor can I provide details.

I heard that story.  I have no idea if its true or not.  If true, it would seem that when the student center was shelved, there was no project to donate to.  You can't put money toward a project that isn't going to be built.
Report Spam   Logged
xtey92a
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7797



View Profile
« Reply #46 on: April 06, 2016, 11:20:13 am »

Can you elaborate on this, who are they giving scholarships to at Virginia?

VAF funds ALL NCAA allowed Athletic Scholarships. Season tickets are purchased through them. They have an off grounds building across the street, they also pay the coaches, base pay and benefits comes from the University, I've been told. Donations to Athletics goes to the Fund. University finds Student tickets and faculty tickets.

Virginia is a low tax state, and does not fund the state colleges well. Endowment is planning to go without state support in the future. Direct payment for in state students. Governor appoints all to the Board of Visitors, though. Huge political plum.

VAF is independent, so the only oversight is for legal and tax purposes. PM if you have more questions.
Report Spam   Logged

#ProudToBeARam
ace93
Arbitrary and Capricious Administrator
Raging Lunatic
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 20147



View Profile
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2016, 11:20:27 am »

I heard that story.  I have no idea if its true or not.  If true, it would seem that when the student center was shelved, there was no project to donate to.  You can't put money toward a project that isn't going to be built.

It happened before it got shelved, it was very early on. The dorm was a higher priority and they did not want it going unfunded, so they steered donors that way. Then the student center had no money going towards it, so it got shelved.
Report Spam   Logged

Nothing replaces success in the revenue sports.  Nothing.  That's not to take away from the success in the Olympic sports - they do matter.  It isn't a replacement for success in the flagship sports. - Debbie Yow, AD - NC State
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #48 on: April 06, 2016, 11:27:41 am »

VAF funds ALL NCAA allowed Athletic Scholarships. Season tickets are purchased through them. They have an off grounds building across the street, they also pay the coaches, base pay and benefits comes from the University, I've been told. Donations to Athletics goes to the Fund. University finds Student tickets and faculty tickets.

Virginia is a low tax state, and does not fund the state colleges well. Endowment is planning to go without state support in the future. Direct payment for in state students. Governor appoints all to the Board of Visitors, though. Huge political plum.

VAF is independent, so the only oversight is for legal and tax purposes. PM if you have more questions.

There is a pretty big difference between "awarding" scholarships and "funding" them.  The VAF does what every public university related foundation does.  Public universities can't accept private monies so they set up foundations to do this for them. 
Report Spam   Logged
SIram
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 6301



View Profile
« Reply #49 on: April 06, 2016, 11:29:47 am »

It happened before it got shelved, it was very early on. The dorm was a higher priority and they did not want it going unfunded, so they steered donors that way. Then the student center had no money going towards it, so it got shelved.

Looks like they got what they really wanted all along and it makes you question if there was ever any real adminastrative support for a new student center
Report Spam   Logged
xtey92a
Hall of Famer
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 7797



View Profile
« Reply #50 on: April 06, 2016, 11:35:48 am »

The Virginia Athletics Foundation works the same way that foundations for virtually every public university conduct business.  They raise money on behalf of the University and fund university programs and projects. UVa's foundation is no different than any other university related foundation in the country.  They also DO NOT award scholarships.  They raise money so the athletic department can award scholarships for their recruited athletes.  Again, this is no different than what Michigan, Rutgers, Texas or Alabama does.

If you are referring to Fordham's fundraising program, I have never heard of any major gifts being diverted from athletics to another area.  If you know of a case, please give details.

I went there, VAF is a separate corporation. A lifelong Dean told me the story of the Virginia Student Aid Foundation, now VAF. UVA also has an Athletic dept for compliance and Academics. Google VAF for the whole story.
Report Spam   Logged

#ProudToBeARam
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #51 on: April 06, 2016, 11:38:46 am »

It happened before it got shelved, it was very early on. The dorm was a higher priority and they did not want it going unfunded, so they steered donors that way. Then the student center had no money going towards it, so it got shelved.

You may be right that is different from what I heard.  I heard the student center came off the table early on.  In any case, that's what happens when you don't do a feasibility study.

Donor's are "steered" to the President's priorities all the time.  Major donors believe in the President's leadership and priorities and are usually willing to support them.  That's the way it works.  I think that is very different from the Fordham fable that prospective athletic donors are told that they can't donate to athletics.  There have been very few significant athletic projects to donate to.
Report Spam   Logged
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #52 on: April 06, 2016, 11:48:00 am »

I went there, VAF is a separate corporation. A lifelong Dean told me the story of the Virginia Student Aid Foundation, now VAF. UVA also has an Athletic dept for compliance and Academics. Google VAF for the whole story.

I understand.  That's pretty much the way they all operate.  UConn was the same way.  Rutgers operates two foundations, one for athletics and one for the University.  Private universities don't need foundations but there are a few that have them, mostly to fund construction.
Report Spam   Logged
RealDeal
Sophomore
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 850


View Profile
« Reply #53 on: April 06, 2016, 11:55:03 am »

Penn State has an advisory board for Athletics.
Too bad they don't have an advisory board to keep criminals away from defenceless children..

And yes Villanova is a good model for Fordham, and it can happen.  Solution: write a few checks people.
Report Spam   Logged
Scott W 86
Senior
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2475



View Profile
« Reply #54 on: April 06, 2016, 12:11:36 pm »

Grassroots efforts are nice but because of the money involved today they're basically meaningless.  It has to come from the top.

Amen  ...  Let's focus on "who is at the top (next)"
Report Spam   Logged
VinnyT37
Waterboy

Offline Offline

Posts: 16


View Profile
« Reply #55 on: April 06, 2016, 12:24:05 pm »

No it's not.  I was at UConn when they made the move to FBS football.  It was an institutionally driven seven year plan.  I worked on the fundraising plan and I talked to AD's all over the country. 

You'll never take the card out of "their" hand.  It's their card and their hand.  The University leadership has to provide juice to make it go.  Any school who has built a strong program from scratch or resurrected a dead program has done it because the University powers recognized what athletics can bring.  BC, UConn, Rutgers, the Florida State schools, Old Dominion, UNC Charlotte, Navy, Coastal Carolina, Stony Brook... you name it.  Alumni jumped on board because the University said this is a priority and we're doing it.  Grassroots efforts are nice but because of the money involved today they're basically meaningless.  It has to come from the top.

The UConn experience isn't relevant to us. 

On the other hand, the Villanova experiences are. 

You are aware that 'Nova was not originally included in the original Big East, and it was a "grass roots" initiative of supportive alumni that demonstrated that the funds were there to support the move?  That's why 'Nova did not join the Big East until its second season.

And you are aware that football was defunct at 'Nova, and it was a "grass roots" initiative of alumni that brought the game back in the mid-1980s, and then got it elevated to I-AA level?

Eventually Villanova did not like how powerful this "grass roots" movement became, and they acted to shut down these groups -- but not before they got their wishes for football and Big East basketball.  You should read up on the lawsuit Villanova filed against their own alumni, which was motivated by an effort to regain control from these alumni.

We should have such problems.  http://articles.philly.com/2000-11-22/news/25611973_1_alumni-organization-athletic-programs-university-status

Even though Villanova eventually ran this group out of existence, this group is responsible for Big East basketball and a top FCS football at Villanova.  What happened Monday night would have never happened without them.
Report Spam   Logged
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #56 on: April 06, 2016, 12:30:25 pm »

The UConn experience isn't relevant to us. 

On the other hand, the Villanova experiences are. 

You are aware that 'Nova was not originally included in the original Big East, and it was a "grass roots" initiative of supportive alumni that demonstrated that the funds were there to support the move?  That's why 'Nova did not join the Big East until its second season.

And you are aware that football was defunct at 'Nova, and it was a "grass roots" initiative of alumni that brought the game back in the mid-1980s, and then got it elevated to I-AA level?

Eventually Villanova did not like how powerful this "grass roots" movement became, and they acted to shut down these groups -- but not before they got their wishes for football and Big East basketball.  You should read up on the lawsuit Villanova filed against their own alumni, which was motivated by an effort to regain control from these alumni.

We should have such problems.  http://articles.philly.com/2000-11-22/news/25611973_1_alumni-organization-athletic-programs-university-status

UConn's not relevant?  I thought the goal was to be successful.  Oh wait...

The BE came about 35 years ago.  That's the stone age.  Talk about not relevant. 

Villanova wanted control of its name and images and wanted to do its own fundraising for its priorities.  This is a standard operating procedure. 

Ok, have your bake sale.  Good luck.

The only way to build a successful athletic program is for the light bulb to go on at the top of the institution.  It's their ball and they say who plays.
Report Spam   Logged
VinnyT37
Waterboy

Offline Offline

Posts: 16


View Profile
« Reply #57 on: April 06, 2016, 12:56:08 pm »

UConn's not relevant?  I thought the goal was to be successful.  Oh wait...

The BE came about 35 years ago.  That's the stone age.  Talk about not relevant. 

Villanova wanted control of its name and images and wanted to do its own fundraising for its priorities.  This is a standard operating procedure. 

Ok, have your bake sale.  Good luck.

The only way to build a successful athletic program is for the light bulb to go on at the top of the institution.  It's their ball and they say who plays.

The UConn experience isn't relevant because big-time football was a goal internally. 

A more successful basketball program is not a goal being championed internally at Fordham.

The Villanova experience is relevant because the flame to pursue higher objectives came from outside alumni. 

And you can brush off what Villanova did by claiming it wanted to control its "name and images," but I know people who were involved, and they will tell you the goal was to neuter an alumni group that had become too successful is establishing athletic priorities for the school.  As I said, we should hope to become such a problem.

There is already a history of successful grass-root initiatives at Fordham.  It was a grass-roots movement that caused the move from the Patriot League to the A-10 in the first place.  With the same level of commitment, we must now show that we are willing to financially support a successful A-10 basketball program. 

I might be inclined to agree with you if the goal was to build a first-rate on-campus facility.  We wouldn't be able to make that work financially without a genuine commitment on the part of the school. 

What I'm suggesting is that 3,000 alumni, either personally or through their business, make a commitment to purchase $1,600 worth of tickets a year for eight games at Barclays.  You want to know something?  At Villanova, this type of commitment, on a level significantly exceeding what I have suggested, is already in place.  The question was: "Is Villanova a good model for Fordham athletics?"

So let's take a look of how Villanova got to be where it is at today.  My model is the 'Nova model.  In 1979, Nova alumni went out to solicit commitments to become season ticket holders, and used the commitment to tip the school's decision to join the Big East.

I can't believe a person in your position is not aware of the 'Nova case study.  It has been openly discussed in fora like CASE over the years.

I know that you internal development guys like to wax on forever about things like the "fountain of alumni engagement."  Accomplished alumni laugh about such things.
Report Spam   Logged
VinnyT37
Waterboy

Offline Offline

Posts: 16


View Profile
« Reply #58 on: April 06, 2016, 01:09:17 pm »

Also, if you were to look closely at Villanova, its alumni supporters receive tangible benefits that makes paying far too much for individual basketball tickets something worthwhile.

Through their support over the years, they have build a recognized brand in Nova basketball.  That takes years of commitment.  However, taking an account to a Nova game is now recognized to be a great business perk for the client.

Because many of these alumni have been involved since the early formation days of the Big East, they can make insider perks available to their accounts -- meet-and-greet sessions with Jay Wright and the team, etc.  Hey, top supporters joined in to rent chartered jets to take their best accounts to Houston for the Final Four.  And in the end, whatever they are paying to support the program, they are getting far more back in good will and business revenue.  That's why they promised to buy over-priced season tickets in the first place.
Report Spam   Logged
An Old Coach
Raging Lunatic
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 12000


View Profile
« Reply #59 on: April 06, 2016, 01:20:21 pm »

The UConn experience isn't relevant because big-time football was a goal internally. 

A more successful basketball program is not a goal being championed internally at Fordham.

The Villanova experience is relevant because the flame to pursue higher objectives came from outside alumni. 

And you can brush off what Villanova did by claiming it wanted to control its "name and images," but I know people who were involved, and they will tell you the goal was to neuter an alumni group that had become too successful is establishing athletic priorities for the school.  As I said, we should hope to become such a problem.

There is already a history of successful grass-root initiatives at Fordham.  It was a grass-roots movement that caused the move from the Patriot League to the A-10 in the first place.  With the same level of commitment, we must now show that we are willing to financially support a successful A-10 basketball program. 

I might be inclined to agree with you if the goal was to build a first-rate on-campus facility.  We wouldn't be able to make that work financially without a genuine commitment on the part of the school. 

What I'm suggesting is that 3,000 alumni, either personally or through their business, make a commitment to purchase $1,600 worth of tickets a year for eight games at Barclays.  You want to know something?  At Villanova, this type of commitment, on a level significantly exceeding what I have suggested, is already in place.  The question was: "Is Villanova a good model for Fordham athletics?"

So let's take a look of how Villanova got to be where it is at today.  My model is the 'Nova model.  In 1979, Nova alumni went out to solicit commitments to become season ticket holders, and used the commitment to tip the school's decision to join the Big East.

I can't believe a person in your position is not aware of the 'Nova case study.  It has been openly discussed in fora like CASE over the years.

I know that you internal development guys like to wax on forever about things like the "fountain of alumni engagement."  Accomplished alumni laugh about such things.

Exactly!!!!  UConn football was an institutional priority and that's why they had a stadium and major bowl game within 10 years!  They did the same thing with basketball in the 80's.  The University made them priorities, hired good people and got it done.  There are no NCAA Championships or Gampel Pavilion otherwise!

Here's where you are off base.

Villanova has had a first rate athletic program with huge institutional support forever.  Any alumni/volunteer activity was successful because Villanova had that track record.  They were hardly starting from the ground floor and they were building from success with real money behind it.  Fordham unfortunately doesn't have this.

The people who were successful in getting Fordham into the A-10 did a terrific job.  What they weren't so good at getting was the support to make it successful.  20 years in we may (a big may) finally be getting some footing.  The first 20 years haven't been so good (huge understatement) because the internal support hasn't been there.  Over the past few years Fordham is finally spending enough money for us to be at least representative.  We're still short about $125 million to be seriously competitive.  

I don't wax on about anything.  University fundraising and athletics are both big business and neither work unless the President and Board of the institution are behind them.  Money talks and everything else walks.  If Fordham wants to come close to replicating what Villanova has, it has to be an institutional priority and the University has to be the driver with major money behind it.  You're kidding yourself if you think any other way.
Report Spam   Logged

Pages: 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by EzPortal
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Buy traffic for your forum/website
traffic-masters
Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Page created in 0.284 seconds with 13 queries.