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John
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« Reply #30 on: April 06, 2017, 08:39:21 pm »

Again the community at large could not care less about Hurley and Saint Anthony basketball or the school closing. I grew up and live in Jersey I am telling you a few people kept this going because they liked Hurley but generally everyone knew paying one dollar to send a kid to that school was a waste of money.  Papers will write a few stories but tomorrow he will be forgotten except for very few.  It was a matter of time and very few give a crap.  Adios there are many other better schools to send kids to. 

Rather harsh, no? The school took in kids from generally disadvantaged backgrounds, and had a 100% college acceptance rate. A lot of folks, Coach Hurley included, spent decades working hard at that school and making kids' lives better.

Don't assume institutions like that, or the people who run them, fade from memory so quickly. My favorite teacher from Archbishop Molloy HS (nearly half a century ago) passed away recently in San Diego, where he'd lived for years. In a few weeks, hundreds will gather on Long Island for a memorial. And while my alma mater is still going strong, schools like Power Memorial and Brooklyn Prep, which closed years ago, continue their contributions to the city and nation.
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« Reply #31 on: April 06, 2017, 08:43:27 pm »

Please with this , exactly why I hate the whole Hurley myth. He was the basketball coach, then they made him president in June of 2014. His hard work? Please, the placed collapsed after he became president.  Exactly what hard work did he do to keep the school open?

He went many years without taking a salary; he was a tireless fundraiser for the school.  He did more than anyone to keep that school open.  As I said, their financial problems go back to the 80's, predating his presidency by nearly 30 years.
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« Reply #32 on: April 06, 2017, 08:56:33 pm »

Rather harsh, no? The school took in kids from generally disadvantaged backgrounds, and had a 100% college acceptance rate. A lot of folks, Coach Hurley included, spent decades working hard at that school and making kids' lives better.

Don't assume institutions like that, or the people who run them, fade from memory so quickly. My favorite teacher from Archbishop Molloy HS (nearly half a century ago) passed away recently in San Diego, where he'd lived for years. In a few weeks, hundreds will gather on Long Island for a memorial. And while my alma mater is still going strong, schools like Power Memorial and Brooklyn Prep, which closed years ago, continue their contributions to the city and nation.

Harsh is an understatement.

Excellent post!
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« Reply #33 on: April 06, 2017, 09:19:18 pm »

He went many years without taking a salary; he was a tireless fundraiser for the school.  He did more than anyone to keep that school open.  As I said, their financial problems go back to the 80's, predating his presidency by nearly 30 years.

And you know this how?   Tireless fundraiser, was he trained by Frank?

100% acceptance rate to college?  My sister in law begs to differ!
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« Reply #34 on: April 06, 2017, 09:33:45 pm »

http://www.espn.com/mens-college-basketball/story/_/id/19086417/st-anthony-high-school-close-end-school-year
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« Reply #35 on: April 06, 2017, 09:41:33 pm »

And you know this how?   Tireless fundraiser, was he trained by Frank?

100% acceptance rate to college?  My sister in law begs to differ!

I lived in JC for a number of years, and casually followed what was going on there.  Hurley made connections to get some Wall St money, and hosted many fundraisers.  Google his salary if you don't believe me, I'm not doing your work for you.  You don't like the Hurley's, that's fine, but despite knowing nothing about the situation, you still question anyone who does.
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« Reply #36 on: April 06, 2017, 09:59:20 pm »

Basketball factory substandard education. Well known in jersey.  Many catholic schools take kids from disadvantaged areas this place was about high school basketball.  Naming the basketball coach as the president pretty much says it all.  The article ACE posted says it all public schools and charter schools provided all but hoops player better educations. 
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« Reply #37 on: April 06, 2017, 10:18:01 pm »

Again the community at large could not care less about Hurley and Saint Anthony basketball or the school closing. I grew up and live in Jersey I am telling you a few people kept this going because they liked Hurley but generally everyone knew paying one dollar to send a kid to that school was a waste of money.  Papers will write a few stories but tomorrow he will be forgotten except for very few.  It was a matter of time and very few give a crap.  Adios there are many other better schools to send kids to. 
Lighten up, Francis.  Most of this isn't true.
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« Reply #38 on: April 06, 2017, 10:21:16 pm »

Lighten up, Francis.  Most of this isn't true.

Actually it is. That is why it has been on the verge of closing for at least 5 years.
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« Reply #39 on: April 06, 2017, 10:22:10 pm »

Its not that simple. The decision is made by the NJ Catholic Diocese and it takes into consideration a lot more than you are making it. If attendance has dwindled as it has then it cannot be sustained. Same thing happened years ago to iconic schools such as Power Memorial in NYC.

Power Memorial's I. Christian Brothers sold their site on West 61st Street in a rising Upper West Side real estate market to use the proceeds to build a school for underprivileged children in South Florida. It was pretty much a mainstream Christian initiative to take real estate that had increased in value to benefit the less fortunate. 
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« Reply #40 on: April 06, 2017, 10:30:12 pm »

Power Memorial's I. Christian Brothers sold their site on West 61st Street in a rising Upper West Side real estate market to use the proceeds to build a school for underprivileged children in South Florida. It was pretty much a mainstream Christian initiative to take real estate that had increased in value to benefit the less fortunate. 

Many small monetarily challenged schools like saint Anthony's are behind public schools in providing kids an education. They don't have the funds to provide the resources necessary to get kids ready for the modern world.  They are raising money to keep the lights on as opposed to providing modern facilities to teach kids.  This was coming for a long time and would have happened years ago if not for basketball. 
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« Reply #41 on: April 06, 2017, 11:15:43 pm »

Actually it is. That is why it has been on the verge of closing for at least 5 years.
First of all, the school has been on the verge for a lot longer than five years.  Second, you don't get books written, movies produced, 60 Minutes segments, to say nothing of the countless newspaper and magazine articles, about you and your program if the "community at large could not care less about you."  I know dozens of basketball and, more importantly, non-basketball people who have been talking about the fate of St. Anthony for years (certainly more in recent weeks), and that's without leaving my little world.  Second of all, the guy is constantly fund raising at a grassroots level - there aren't a few people keeping the school open.  Are there bigger and better schools?  Of course, but that's not the point of St. Anthony.  The school covers, I think, 50% of the tuition for every student via fund raising.  They fought to keep the doors open not just for the basketball players, but for the kids that don't have better educational opportunities.  Economics. Politics.  It's been a losing battle all along for St. Anthony, it just so happened that Hurley built the premier high school basketball program in the country for the better part of four decades at that school, which is what kept the doors open this long.  The impact he's had on that community, and the respect he's garnered is legendary.  To claim otherwise is just dumb.
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« Reply #42 on: April 07, 2017, 06:28:18 am »

Rather harsh, no? The school took in kids from generally disadvantaged backgrounds, and had a 100% college acceptance rate. A lot of folks, Coach Hurley included, spent decades working hard at that school and making kids' lives better.

Don't assume institutions like that, or the people who run them, fade from memory so quickly. My favorite teacher from Archbishop Molloy HS (nearly half a century ago) passed away recently in San Diego, where he'd lived for years. In a few weeks, hundreds will gather on Long Island for a memorial. And while my alma mater is still going strong, schools like Power Memorial and Brooklyn Prep, which closed years ago, continue their contributions to the city and nation.

Very true, John.  Schools like St. Anthony's were successful and provided opportunity to kids with few options.  They do a great job for kids who would fall through the cracks in huge urban warehouse high schools. Hurley tried for several years to hold back the tide. The president shouldn't be confused with the principal. Two different jobs. Generally, the president is a non-academic position.   In the end, when the sponsoring agency withdraws support, no school can continue to function. 

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« Reply #43 on: April 07, 2017, 07:43:18 am »

First of all, the school has been on the verge for a lot longer than five years.  Second, you don't get books written, movies produced, 60 Minutes segments, to say nothing of the countless newspaper and magazine articles, about you and your program if the "community at large could not care less about you."  I know dozens of basketball and, more importantly, non-basketball people who have been talking about the fate of St. Anthony for years (certainly more in recent weeks), and that's without leaving my little world.  Second of all, the guy is constantly fund raising at a grassroots level - there aren't a few people keeping the school open.  Are there bigger and better schools?  Of course, but that's not the point of St. Anthony.  The school covers, I think, 50% of the tuition for every student via fund raising.  They fought to keep the doors open not just for the basketball players, but for the kids that don't have better educational opportunities.  Economics. Politics.  It's been a losing battle all along for St. Anthony, it just so happened that Hurley built the premier high school basketball program in the country for the better part of four decades at that school, which is what kept the doors open this long.  The impact he's had on that community, and the respect he's garnered is legendary.  To claim otherwise is just dumb.

And leave it right there, he is a great high school coach. No connection with us. We had Jio Fontan and Billy Lovette.   This is a high school story.  Gene Keady was a D1 head coach for nearly 30 years and went to the NCAA tournament 18 times. Apples and Bananas.
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« Reply #44 on: April 07, 2017, 08:15:46 am »

Saying those kids do not have better educational opportunities is the fallacy here. If you need a high school basketball team to stay open the education you are providing is not cutting it.  The books etc are about basketball, it is supposed to be a high school. 
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« Reply #45 on: April 07, 2017, 08:57:13 am »

Why is this thread in the Fordham basketball section?  Just sayin' . . .
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« Reply #46 on: April 07, 2017, 08:58:25 am »

You have less than 200 students and its coed?  So freshman , jv and varsity for boys and girls?  How many students at the school are not playing basketball?  100% acceptance rate to college?  What does that mean ? if you got into Hudson CC, does that count?    

That was my point 71, who the hell cares about Hurley in Fordham basketball, someone suggested we hire him, ala Gene Keady.

We have a great X&O coach and a great assistant in Crawford. Enough with this nonsense.
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« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2017, 09:39:40 am »

First of all, the school has been on the verge for a lot longer than five years.  Second, you don't get books written, movies produced, 60 Minutes segments, to say nothing of the countless newspaper and magazine articles, about you and your program if the "community at large could not care less about you."  I know dozens of basketball and, more importantly, non-basketball people who have been talking about the fate of St. Anthony for years (certainly more in recent weeks), and that's without leaving my little world.  Second of all, the guy is constantly fund raising at a grassroots level - there aren't a few people keeping the school open.  Are there bigger and better schools?  Of course, but that's not the point of St. Anthony.  The school covers, I think, 50% of the tuition for every student via fund raising.  They fought to keep the doors open not just for the basketball players, but for the kids that don't have better educational opportunities.  Economics. Politics.  It's been a losing battle all along for St. Anthony, it just so happened that Hurley built the premier high school basketball program in the country for the better part of four decades at that school, which is what kept the doors open this long.  The impact he's had on that community, and the respect he's garnered is legendary.  To claim otherwise is just dumb.

The issues confronting Catholic HS in the inner cities today are so different than those of the suburban Catholic HS.  Just not understanding the animosity towards a man who could have made multiples of his salary at the collegiate level but instead chose to stay at the school and the program he built from scratch? 

I mentor students at my HS, The Mount, and the issues they and the school face are so different from the Iona Preps, Chaminades and St. Anthony's/LI of the world. The school subsidizes a large part of each student's tuition but does not have the access to the wealth that these other schools have. For the parents of these kids it is indeed a sacrifice to send them to the school.  I applaud Coach Hurley for his dedication to providing opportunities to not only his players but to other kids who did not play ball for him.
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« Reply #48 on: April 07, 2017, 09:46:47 am »

Why is this thread in the Fordham basketball section?  Just sayin' . . .

That's a good point. The story was first posted in the Water Cooler, not sure it was in the right spot there either, and then someone else decided to ask whether it made sense to hire Bob Hurley in some capacity at Fordham. People strayed from that to a more general conversation about Hurley and the school.

My other thought is, it's the off-season, who cares!
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« Reply #49 on: April 07, 2017, 09:51:55 am »

seems like some folks on the board get little hurleys* in their trousers when they talk about this family.   Evil

Not sure why . . . just basketball coaches . . .

But you're right Ace, not much else going on.


* Irish sports joke.
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« Reply #50 on: April 07, 2017, 09:59:42 am »

The issues confronting Catholic HS in the inner cities today are so different than those of the suburban Catholic HS.  Just not understanding the animosity towards a man who could have made multiples of his salary at the collegiate level but instead chose to stay at the school and the program he built from scratch? 

I mentor students at my HS, The Mount, and the issues they and the school face are so different from the Iona Preps, Chaminades and St. Anthony's/LI of the world. The school subsidizes a large part of each student's tuition but does not have the access to the wealth that these other schools have. For the parents of these kids it is indeed a sacrifice to send them to the school.  I applaud Coach Hurley for his dedication to providing opportunities to not only his players but to other kids who did not play ball for him.


You think these basketball players are Catholic?

A few years back St. Mary's dominated hockey in NY State, multiple time state champs.  You think Swedish kids or the Ukranians were practicing Catholics seeking a catholic education?  At what point do drop the farce of being a "Catholic" school and just recognize that you are a small private school?

Everytime a Hurley is mentioned, someone here sees fit to somehow tie it to Fordham. Its old.
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« Reply #51 on: April 07, 2017, 10:12:23 am »


Yo think these basketball players are Catholic?

Who cares, at the Mount these days Baptists comprise over a quarter of the student body and non-Catholics nearly 40%.  The parents recognize the benefits of a structured education in a safe environment.

When St. Dominic's in Oyster Bay was trying to dig out from its multiple sex scandals, they were offering athletic scholarships like they were condoms at a NYC public HS. Catholicism was the least requirement they had.

If I had basketball talent and lived in the inner city, playing for a man Coach Hurley and the cache of his program would make a lot of sense to me. 
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« Reply #52 on: April 07, 2017, 10:19:06 am »

Who cares, at the Mount these days Baptists comprise over a quarter of the student body and non-Catholics nearly 40%.  The parents recognize the benefits of a structured education in a safe environment.

When St. Dominic's in Oyster Bay was trying to dig out from its multiple sex scandals, they were offering athletic scholarships like they were condoms at a NYC public HS. Catholicism was the least requirement they had.

If I had basketball talent and lived in the inner city, playing for a man Coach Hurley and the cache of his program would make a lot of sense to me. 


Its a private school. Period. They failed. Period. Nobody cares. It has no relevance to Fordham basketball.

Why mask yourself as a Catholic school if your students are not Catholic? Do Catholic kids go to school at Yeshiva?  Maybe if these schools stopped hiding behind the veil of being Catholic and just became a private school for all faiths to help underprivileged kids, they might survive. Especially since that is truly what they have become in many instances.

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« Reply #53 on: April 07, 2017, 10:29:53 am »

And leave it right there, he is a great high school coach. No connection with us. We had Jio Fontan and Billy Lovette.   This is a high school story.  Gene Keady was a D1 head coach for nearly 30 years and went to the NCAA tournament 18 times. Apples and Bananas.
You're absolutely right.
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« Reply #54 on: April 07, 2017, 10:37:06 am »

Saying those kids do not have better educational opportunities is the fallacy here. If you need a high school basketball team to stay open the education you are providing is not cutting it.  The books etc are about basketball, it is supposed to be a high school. 
No it's not.  The academic landscape is changing and hopefully improving in our cities, but I have several close friends who grew up in Jersey City - all highly educated - who will tell you St. Anthony serves a greater good, even though they did not go there.  That's the point ... although not the point of the original post in this thread.
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« Reply #55 on: April 07, 2017, 10:43:08 am »


Its a private school. Period. They failed. Period. Nobody cares. It has no relevance to Fordham basketball.

Why mask yourself as a Catholic school if your students are not Catholic? Do Catholic kids go to school at Yeshiva?  Maybe if these schools stopped hiding behind the veil of being Catholic and just became a private school for all faiths to help underprivileged kids, they might survive. Especially since that is truly what they have become in many instances.



They do not mask themselves as a Catholic school.  It is very clearly understood that you are attending a private Catholic HS but where you are mistaken is your statement that they cannot help underprivileged kids of all faiths and still remain true to their Catholic values and principals.  They do so everyday.
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« Reply #56 on: April 07, 2017, 11:03:25 am »

No it's not.  The academic landscape is changing and hopefully improving in our cities, but I have several close friends who grew up in Jersey City - all highly educated - who will tell you St. Anthony serves a greater good, even though they did not go there.  That's the point ... although not the point of the original post in this thread.


Greater good is fine. Does the Catholic church marry people in Church who are not Catholic? Do we have non Catholic funerals or baptisms? You think its a good idea for Scientologists or Muslin kids or Orthodox Jews to be going to a Catholic high school? What do they do during the weekly mass or the pre-class prayer?  I cant come to school this week because it is Ramadan or Passover or some other religious holy week?

I dont care what someone's religion is or isnt but Catholic school is just that.   If there are not enough practicing Catholics to attend, then either close or simply change your mission to be a private school for all without a diocesan or Catholic affiliation. Populations change, especially in urban areas.   Forcing non Catholics into Catholic schools just to stay open is wayward of the mission of Catholic schools, in my opinion. Im sure many disagree.

For example, the mission statement of Holy Trinity Diocesan HS in Long Island:

"It is the mission of Holy Trinity High School to be a living witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ as a community of faith, hope and love.  We seek to educate the whole person: mind, heart, soul and body and to motivate all students in the pursuit of truth and academic excellence, preparing them for future educational opportunities and service to the Church and to the world. "


From Mt. St. Michael's Belief statement on it's webpage:

A Catholic school exists first and foremost to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ.

 
 
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« Reply #57 on: April 07, 2017, 11:28:53 am »

That's a good point. The story was first posted in the Water Cooler, not sure it was in the right spot there either, ...

Just trying to understand the rules.  Should I have not posted this at all?  Or was Sports Talk (Water Cooler) not the right spot?  That seemed the most logical place.
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« Reply #58 on: April 07, 2017, 11:47:44 am »

Just trying to understand the rules.  Should I have not posted this at all?  Or was Sports Talk (Water Cooler) not the right spot?  That seemed the most logical place.

I am more than fine with you posting it, and I think you picked the most logical place. Mostly I am just saying that I do not know if we have a perfect spot for it. What you posted was about a HS closing, so not sure it is truly sports talk, but I thought it was fine.
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« Reply #59 on: April 07, 2017, 12:02:16 pm »



Greater good is fine. Does the Catholic church marry people in Church who are not Catholic? Do we have non Catholic funerals or baptisms? You think its a good idea for Scientologists or Muslin kids or Orthodox Jews to be going to a Catholic high school? What do they do during the weekly mass or the pre-class prayer?  I cant come to school this week because it is Ramadan or Passover or some other religious holy week?

I dont care what someone's religion is or isnt but Catholic school is just that.   If there are not enough practicing Catholics to attend, then either close or simply change your mission to be a private school for all without a diocesan or Catholic affiliation. Populations change, especially in urban areas.   Forcing non Catholics into Catholic schools just to stay open is wayward of the mission of Catholic schools, in my opinion. Im sure many disagree.

For example, the mission statement of Holy Trinity Diocesan HS in Long Island:

"It is the mission of Holy Trinity High School to be a living witness to the Gospel of Jesus Christ as a community of faith, hope and love.  We seek to educate the whole person: mind, heart, soul and body and to motivate all students in the pursuit of truth and academic excellence, preparing them for future educational opportunities and service to the Church and to the world. "


From Mt. St. Michael's Belief statement on it's webpage:

A Catholic school exists first and foremost to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ.

 
 

The 1950s just called, they want your views on Catholic education back.
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